Tag: Author Role

The “Author” role is one of the default user roles in WordPress, alongside “Subscriber”, “Contributor”, “Editor” and “Administrator”. Authors have a medium level of access to WordPress: more permissions than some roles and less than others.

Here’s a rundown of what Authors can do on a default WordPress site:

  1. Edit, delete and publish their own posts
  2. Write comments
  3. Upload files to the Media Library

WordPress Authors and Comments on Their Posts

Comments Authors

We had a question this week from a PublishPress customer who wanted to understand the relationship between authors and their WordPress posts. They wanted to know if authors could see – or perhaps even manage – comments on other people's posts.

This tutorial is a guide to understanding the control that users have over comments on posts they have written. You can also follow this link if you want a guide to moderating comments in WordPress.

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Show Author Content from All WordPress Post Types

Show Post Types Author 1

On a normal WordPress site, every author automatically gets their own page. So, if my username is “steve”, I'll have my own URL which will look like /author/steve/. This contains all the Posts I've written on the site.

A good example of this can be found on the popular WPTavern.com blog. One of the main authors is called “Sarah” and you'll find her content at /author/sarah/.

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How to Show or Hide Other Users’ Posts in WordPress

Show Hide Posts

By default, WordPress users in the admin area can see all the Posts on the site, regardless of whether they are the author.

This is not a problem for many sites. After all, most Posts on most sites are publicly available – there's no need to hide them.

However, in some situations, site owners don't want authors to see the Posts that other users are working on. For example, one PublishPress customer wanted to create a private inbox for WordPress users.

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How to Enable Lazy Loading for WordPress Comments

Lazy Loading Comments

“Lazy Loading” is a technique that helps the important parts of your site load quickly for visitors.

Lazy Loading makes sure that page elements that are non-critical will load after the more important elements.

Imagine you open an article you want to read on the internet. Usually, you would start at the title and perhaps eventually read down to the comments. It makes perfect sense to load the title first and then load the comments later.

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How to Create Private Journals in WordPress

Private Journals

One PublishPress user wrote to us and asked about this situation: “I would like every user to get a place where they can enter their own journal entries that no one else can see.”

This it is possible to set up private journals with the PublishPress plugins, and I'll explain how in this post.

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How to Control Permissions for the Contact Form 7 Plugin

Contact Form 7 Header

Contact Form 7 is one of the most popular plugins in the WordPress world. However, it is a fairly basic plugin that lacks some key features such as access control.

In this guide, I'll show you how to control access to Contact Form 7 features. We'll use the PublishPress Capabilities plugin. If you want to take this tutorial a step further, check out how to control access to Contact Form 7 admin menus.

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How to Prevent WordPress Users from Creating New Tags

Tags Stop

We had an interesting question from a PublishPress user this week:

I am trying to allow a some user role to choose an existing Tag, but not allow them to create new Tags. This was simple enough to do with Categories, but I cannot figure it out for Tags.

This was a great question that requires some explanation. We recommend the TaxoPress plugin for managing your tags, but PublishPress plugins can handle these more complex permissions.

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The Ultimate Guide to WordPress Revisions

Ultimate Revisions Guide

Many of us spend a lot of time working on our content. We spend hours making sure the spelling, grammar, punctuation are as good as possible.

So we are worried about losing content. What happens if my browser crashes? What happens if someone edits my post and makes a mistake?

Fortunately, WordPress has the solution: Revisions.

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Use Author Data to Automatically Create WordPress Tags

Authors Tags 1

This week, one PublishPress customer was in a situation where they needed to create Tags based on the Authors of a post.

The goal was that when someone writes a post, their name was automatically added as a Tag.

Once this was done, the customer could use the Tags to trigger other functionality. For example, they could use PublishPress notifications to send an email for any post that has the Tag for specific authors.

We wrote some code that automatically adds Author details as Tags. You can pull any information from your Author profiles and use that to create Tags.

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